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Dispose Of These Five Unique Items Properly

We try our best to sort our waste carefully: food scraps, food-soiled paper, and landscape materials in the green cart, clean paper and cardboard, metal cans, plastic containers and glass bottles in the blue cart, and most other objects in the black cart. But…what about those objects that don’t belong in any of the carts? Fear not! Let’s talk about how to properly dispose of five common items that don’t belong in your waste carts and how you can dispose of them responsibly.

1. Batteries

Batteries are abundant—they’re in our phones, children’s toys, even those singing holiday cards! From small to large, NO battery belongs in any of your carts. When put into the garbage and buried in landfills, heavy metals from batteries pool at the bottom of the landfill’s plastic liner. If that “garbage juice” is accidently released into the environment, all of those heavy metals contaminate soil and water. Batteries shouldn’t be put into the recycling either! Batteries that are wrongly put into the recycling are dangerous for waste sorting facilities such as our Shoreway Environmental Center. Batteries pose a significant fire hazard that can cause serious risk to employees and costly damage.

So, how should batteries be disposed of? It’s simple!

For single-family households, tape up the ends of your old batteries, and collect them in a clear, zip-top bag. When the bag is full, place it on top of your black garbage cart on your regular collection day.

For apartments/condominiums, look for an orange battery bucket in the major hubs of your complex (front office, clubhouse, etc.). If you don’t have a battery bucket, reach out to management about acquiring one from Recology. Otherwise, batteries can always be dropped off free of charge at the Shoreway Public Recycling Center.

2. Electronics

Like batteries, electronic devices also contain heavy metals that can cause contamination in our environment. Because of this, electronics do not belong in waste carts either. Electronic waste (old/defunct televisions, computers, phones, VCR’s, and even microwaves!) can be taken to the Shoreway Public Recycling Center for proper disposal—also free of charge.

3. Unwanted or expired medicine

Unwanted or expired medicine should never be thrown into the garbage or flushed down the toilet, as both of these have the potential to harm people and the environment. Return unwanted or expired medicine to local pharmacies and some police stations for the safest disposal! Luckily for us, San Mateo County has over 50 medicine disposal locations available to residents, including 31 in the RethinkWaste service area. To find locations nearest you, visit the San Mateo County Health website.

4. Motor oil and filters

Motor oil is a toxic substance that should never be thrown into the garbage or put down a drain for disposal, and can be collected and burned for fuel use or cleaned to be new oil! If poured down a drain, “one gallon of motor oil can contaminate 1 million gallons of freshwater” (Earth911). Motor oil should be placed in a clear plastic container, like a milk jug, and placed next to your blue recycling cart for pickup on your regular collection day. Contact Recology to request up to five one-gallon jugs for your used motor oil. Additionally, used oil filters can be placed in a clear, zip-top bag and put next to your blue recycling cart for collection. For those who don’t reside in single-family households, motor oil and used oil filters can always be dropped off at the Shoreway Public Recycling Center for disposal—free of charge!

5. Aerosol cans

Aerosol cans are yet another tricky item. They’re typically made of metal, so many folks mistakenly think these cans are recyclable. However, the design of the cans make it hard to completely empty, and the pressurization can cause harm when crushed in a recycling facility if not completely empty. Aerosol cans like spray paint, hairspray, and air fresheners (no food grade cans, like cooking spray), are accepted through San Mateo County’s Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) Program. County residents can schedule a free HHW drop-off appointment at www.smchealth.org.

Reminder that the Shoreway Public Recycling Center in San Carlos is open to residents for free drop-off, with COVID-19 safety precautions. Face masks must be worn while at the facility. Go here for a full list of what is accepted the Public Recycling Center.

Learn more about items accepted through San Mateo County’s Household Hazardous Waste program.

For more information on how to dispose of other tricky items, visit recyclestuff.org.